Ottawa throws lifeline to 50 Million Tree Program cut by Ontario government

June 5, 2019

By: The Working Forest Staff

CBC NEWS — The federal government is putting up $15 million over four years to rescue the 50 Million Tree Program which was cut by the Ontario government of Doug Ford in its last budget, CBC News has learned. 

According to CBC News, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna made the announcement just after noon on Wednesday in Ottawa, explaining how the new cash will extend the program for at least another four years. She said in a statement to CBC News on Tuesday that preserving the program will mean cleaner air, a healthier environment, and good local jobs. 

“While Mr. Ford cuts programs that support tree planting, forest firefighting, flood management, and tackling climate change, we will continue to invest in a clean future for our environment, our economy, and our kids.”

The 50 Million Tree Program had an annual budget of $4.7 million and had planted more than 27 million trees across the province since 2008. Its goal was to have 50 million planted by 2025.

But a day after Ontario’s budget was delivered, Forests Ontario, the non-profit group that oversees the program, was told funding for it was being eliminated.

This new funding will essentially support the planting and growth of 10 million trees, bringing the program’s total to 37 million. Support for the program beyond that is not part of the announcement. 

Rob Keen, the CEO of Forests Ontario, said it takes three to four years for a tree to go from a seed to being planted in its final destination.

Every year the four key nurseries in Ontario participating in the program cultivate 2.5 million seeds between them, which they nurse over three years until they are ready to be planted in their permanent setting.

The funding cut left 7.5 million saplings at various stages of growth in limbo, with nursery owners unsure how they were going to fund their crops until they were ready to plant.

Nurseries have been asking if they should be planting seeds to be ready for 2023, Keen said. 

“If you don’t have the funding in place … nurseries are not going to plant.”

The new funding “is fantastic because it provides that assurance that there’s going to be funding in there to use up the stock that is currently in the ground and plant some more stock,” he said. 

Ed Patchell, CEO of the Ferguson Tree Nursery in Kemptville, Ont., also welcomes the funding. He told CBC News he has three million trees at his nursery at various stages of growth. He says he was unsure what to do with them but is pleased they will now be guaranteed a permanent home when they are ready to plant.

“I think it’s great that the feds have stepped up. I would like to see the province step up, to see value in the program and contribute as well but we’ll see what happens,” he said.

While nurseries now have the confidence to plant a crop now for delivery in 2023, Keen says it remains unclear if there will be funding next year to plant again.

About 40% of forest cover is needed to ensure forest sustainability, Keen said, and the average right now in southern Ontario is 26%, with some areas as low as five percent.

“The 50 Million Tree Program has been great, but we need to plant one billion trees to really get the forest canopy up in southern Ontario,” he said.

 

See more HERE.

Your comments.

  1. anonymous says:

    Interesting that the article didn’t mention that these trees are planted on private land, mostly in S Ontario. Landowners should be able to afford their own tree planting with the tax incentives they get for a managed forest and the increase in the value of their land.

Your #1 source for forestry and forest industry news.

Built by Sofa Communications