Lavington B.C. residents target pellet plant

March 16, 2016

By: Vernon Morning Star

The light and noise pollution that Lavington residents have been complaining about for months from their industrial neighbours is finally getting some attention.

For the second time in five months, since the Pinnacle Pellet Plant opened in late September, neighbours have aired their concerns with the District of Coldstream.

“Our home has been bombarded with an excess of noise pollution from Tolko as well as Pinnacle,” said Stephanie Hoffman, one of the representatives of LIFE (Lavington Is For Everyone).

“And since our last presentation in October, there have been no light mitigation efforts taken.”

Another resident, Rose Breitkreitz, is also fed up with the constant “clanging, buzzing and forklift noises,” as well as light.

“Even Kelowna Airport isn’t lit as brightly as this is,” said Breitkreitz.

“I hope we can get some resolution on this. It seems like the industry has left us with some bad taste in our mouths, literally.”

The repeated concerns from residents have prompted Coldstream to once again look into getting the complaints addressed.

“We’re going to be having citizens coming back again and again and again,” said Coun. Richard Enns.

Coldstream staff said they have contacted Pinnacle, whose plant supervisor has been looking into the noise situation.

“He’d been out to a couple different properties trying to get a handle on things,” said Trevor Seibel, Coldstream’s chief administrative officer.

Six lights have also been identified as broadcasting, said Seibel, adding that they could look at light shields.

And Pinnacle has not responded to Coldstream’s request to come speak to council.

But Coun. Pat Cochrane points out: “It’s not just Pinnacle. If we’re going to have someone come we should have someone from Tolko as well.”

Cochrane had hoped that following the concerns raised in October from residents that something was already being done about the lights. He is disappointed to see that no action has yet been taken.

“I guess I was a little naive.”

Another issue Lavington residents raised was Coldstream’s noise bylaw, and how it is not being properly enforced.

Council will be gaining a legal opinion into just how enforceable the bylaw is and Coun. Enns has suggested that some changes be made if it is deficient.

Meanwhile an air quality monitoring station at Lavington Baptist Church has been collecting data for months. The Ministry of Environment states that there have been no exceedences reported but a report on the data is in the works.

 

By: Vernon Morning Star

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