Latest Comments

  • John Chittick on
    How mother trees help reduce risk of wildfires

    Coment:
    Pardon my skepticism but the mother tree elixir sounds like a reverse engineered pet research project where the ends justify the too-good-to-be-true claims.

  • John Chittick on
    Old-Growth Summit Rescheduled for April 28

    Coment:
    On top of the most regulated soviet-style forestry jurisdiction on the planet, add another quasi-government level of racial-based and historically revisionist process and what residual level of forestry activity that shakes out will continue the capital flight from BC to jurisdictions less constrained and not administered by a government incestuously linked to ENGOs.

  • John Chittick on
    B.C. appoints Josie Osborne as minster of new land stewardship ministry

    Coment:
    The further residualizing of forestry after every species and interest group has been satisficed will continue the flight of capital to more industry friendly jurisdictions. The former Mayor of Tofino will be right at home when forestry has been driven from her new and much larger jurisdiction.

  • John Chittick on
    Climate change: Five things we’ve learned from the IPCC report

    Coment:
    Cherry-picking the IPCC reports and parroting hysteria that could just as easily have come from 20 years ago with future predictions just as inaccurate is lazy journalism.

  • George Delisle on
    The Truck Loggers Association’s View on Modernizing BC’s Forest Policy

    Coment:
    Maybe it is time that the government hires a couple of consultants to go around the province and assess the value of different harvesting approaches that have been tried over the last 80 years! There are numerous different harvest levels and methods that can be assessed for public acceptance and ecosystem system benefits that may just be the answer to some of our problems. We have to think outside of conventional forestry to come up with methods that will allow the industry to survive. The Provincial Woodlot Program may be a good spot to begin this journey. Out of 850 woodlot licenses there are probably about 10 to 15 % that practice alternative forestry practices. These could be easily assessed for effectiveness at a reasonable cost to get an idea where we should be headed. The Federation of BC Woodlot Associations would be more than happy to assist in this endeavor, they only need to be asked. Yours truly George Delisle

  • Brian Campbell on
    Canfor Calls on BC Government to Rethink Old Growth Deferral Process

    Coment:
    Great letter. Let’s be open to collaborative inclusion of the applied science of sustainable forestry.

  • John Chittick on
    Fears over future of B.C. forestry fundamentals

    Coment:
    The only certainty in forestry in BC is decline. The only thing that the private sector "controls" where 95% of the forests are on Crown land is capital. Competing and conflicting interest groups, (with industry's relationships with them essentially legislated) and tag-team (slightly divergent) ideologically-driven governments are "in control" of everything else. This government includes high profile Ministers who hail from the ENGO "sector" and yet is automatically supported by labour. Is it any surprise that capital flees such a jurisdiction when in reality it is being driven out by ideological statism (fascism or socialism - take your pick) and urban ambivalence.

  • John Chittick on
    Russ Taylor: BC government forest policy changes to cause up to 12,000 job loss

    Coment:
    Russ Taylor described the situation well. This latest iteration of BC forest policy is a predictable response to urban-based perceptions of the permanently inherent toxic sociology of Crown tenure in BC. Politically managing for all species and interest groups on every hectare of land is a fool's errand and yet BC continues as the last great Soviet experiment. Following the path of US public forests in the pacific northwest, BC is trending away from forest management towards stand and stare forestry. Forest stewardship peaked almost thirty years ago and thanks to a previous NDP regime, the industry was rudely reminded that there was no reward for doing a good job on Crown land as that government, followed by their Liberal tag team government just took more of it away which was a pattern set decades earlier. It is no coincidence that some of the largest North American lumber producers are BC companies who have moved into jurisdictions where forests are secure and privately owned.

  • ‘We have to adapt’: Northern Ontario mill owner calls for action on U.S. softwood lumber tariffs

    Coment:
    Let them have it Mr. Dottori. Every year the same stupid arguments from the USA and every time the WTO agrees with Canada. There should be a fee of a few billion dollars just for filing frivolous complaints.

  • John Chittick on
    Old-growth deferrals will help ensure forest industry’s viability — MLA

    Coment:
    This is a classic example of an urban-minded politician ideologically beholden to the Sierra Club whose influence with BC's NDP exceeds its rural supporters. This 10% of BC's current timber harvesting land base that the Sierra Club has been working on preserving is for core areas of old growth from which to expand into connective zones consistent with UN Agenda 2030 which pretty much excludes forest management. These ENGOs with the continuing support of the NDP play the long game. They were able to accomplish this by redefining old growth in ways which have nothing to do with the 20% of the province outside the timber harvesting land base which is ecologically functioning old growth. If those areas are indeed put aside for the benefit of globalist green ambitions, it will come at great cost to the harvest, employment and economy of BC. This MLA is delusional and condescending when she asserts that this will make for a secure future for the industry. Crown tenure in BC is a history of insecurity and continual withdrawal from the working forest and as long as politicians have the hubris that they can satisfy every species and interest group on every hectare of forest, it will continue.

  • george delisle on
    A new US-Canada battle will drive up lumber prices

    Coment:
    It is high time that Trudeau shows some courage over this issue. Maybe Canada should slap a 18% tariff on all fossil fuel exports to the US or some other commodity that the US needs badly. The US is not a good neighbor and it is high time that we recognize that and discourage all travel to the US unless it is essential. It is time that we try to get the people living in the US that depend on Canadians to stand up and support us. George Delisle

  • John Chittick on
    The Forest Industry Has Not Been Heard

    Coment:
    The results of this week's moratorium will be a timber harvesting land base (the farm) pock-marked with islands of remnant old growth forests which would have otherwise been harvested in a planned manner to allow for sustained harvesting of younger stands not adequate for normalized (age class) rotation at present cut levels. If the now urban-based, white-collar owned and operated NDP think that this is the end of US funded campaigns to connect those remnants in a huge contiguous rural preserve they are as deluded as their CORE era predecessors of the 1990s. The goal then was 12% which later became 15% which later became de facto 20% and I've now lost track. Forestry in BC actually means recurring land-use disputes driven by the irresistible target of Crown land which no one and everyone owns (this government seems confused about their ownership) with the only certainty being that lobbying and campaigns funded by the US can tie up land much cheaper through the political process than elsewhere where forests are privately owned, prized, and priced by their actual value.

  • John Chittick on
    BC Forest industry bracing for old growth logging moratoria

    Coment:
    Whatever the outcome of speculation regarding the Old Growth canard, you can be sure that the timber harvesting land base will continue to shrink as the usual funders of the hysteria campaigns know that they can tie up resources worth billions for pennies on the dollar. Crown tenure means politics and toxic sociology drives forestry in BC. The shrinkage will continue until the morale improves.

  • Hybrid trailer-trucks: A breakthrough towards the electrification of heavy trucks

    Coment:
    Seems the Forestry Industry is years behind the Mining Industry if they're just now starting to electrify trailers. Mining already has electric loaders, scoop trams and bolters.

  • John Chittick on
    Siberia’s wildfires are bigger than all the world’s other blazes combined

    Coment:
    Perhaps if we hadn't started recording measurements of temperatures at the coolest trough of the last 10,000 years, the 24/7/365 CAGW hysteria wouldn't be so pronounced despite the obscene level of benefits from the bounty available for fear promotion and our salvation (rent seeking schemes). Eight thousand years ago temperatures were 3 degrees Celsius warmer than today with only 50% of today's atmospheric CO2 (from Icelandic ice core data). Siberia's forests are all fire origin stands but that doesn't stop this year's large fire season from being yet another excuse to fan the flames of more CAGW hysteria.

  • Ontario providing $7.9M to forestry and mining sectors

    Coment:
    "SUDBURY — The Ontario government is providing more than $7.9 million to help support the forestry and mining sectors in northeastern Ontario." I thought Northeastern Ontario included North Bay, Timmins, the Soo and all parts in between. The majority of this cash went to strictly Greater Sudbury companies. C'mon Mr. Rickford, you can do better!

  • John Chittick on
    A PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN TO THE UBC FORESTRY COMMUNITY

    Coment:
    BC, it's tenure system, and related toxic sociology have never achieved the mile post of defining a working forest (a timber harvesting land base THLB) that has lasted beyond a political cycle or two. The dean has laid out the issues well as one would expect from an essentially "politically neutral" perspective but other than continuing down the road of more shrinking of the working forest, lost in a fog of sociological foment. Public land is political land and in BC, politicians won't commit to which fraction of the public they will bend to this week or whether or not they have any sovereignty at all. In the developed world where most working forests are privately owned, economic rents determine land use or in the case of old growth "management", non use or 'stand and stare' forestry. How about selling off all remaining old growth stands and related land base to determine if the value of old growth not already preserved is real or just another zero-cost / infinite-demand commodity (tragedy of the commons). BC has a first rate area of parks and preserves by world standards and for rare ecosystems with "inadequate" representation such as coastal dry douglas fir, recruiting second growth could produce old growth attributes within a few decades, if "needed".

  • John Chittick on
    Forestry in BC – The un-UNDRIP Sector

    Coment:
    I would like to remind the author that stumpage is the return of the sale of the log to the owner(s) "at the stump". Inclusion of the GDP which is the summation of all inputs into the sold logs up to the ultimate customer and has bearing only on what the log value is at the stump (what the logger can afford to pay). In the rest of the planet, forest owners have no claim on downstream economic activities. The NDP have waded into a swamp that will not end well. Beholden to the piety of socialist land ownership, they have embraced a notion of shared "ownership" with (First) nations" whom very likely and logically see the "shared" part as a first step to full (collective) ownership, a position which logically puts all private land as the next step beyond that (if the Crown has no sovereignty on Crown land then the Crown no longer exists nor its grants and deeds). The status of the resulting stateless 94% of BC's population racially unqualified for collective ownership is a question the NDP and SCOC should be prepared for.

  • John Chittick on
    B.C. hires UK economist

    Coment:
    One can always count on the NDP to continue digging in an attempt to get out of its hole. With a tenure system resembling the last great Soviet experiment (before they came to office), capital fleeing the province, heading down an (FN) identity politics road which will be socially untenable when widely discovered, embracing the epistemological mush of ESG, implementing policies ensuring prying eyes of US protectionists will be rewarded with ammunition, why not import a consultant to rationalize the "get woke go broke", mutant, racialist, commercial - state complex. I believe that Mussolini described such relationships as his vision of text book fascism. At least there will be no shortage of rent seekers to line up at the trough while cheering them on. It won't be so pretty when the rest of the province joins them.

  • Clark Brander on
    Gros Morne National Park Vetoes Spruce Budworm Spray Control

    Coment:
    I suggest that the Parks management folks from Gros Morin pay a visit to Cape Breton Highlands Nat'l Park & have a first hand look at the results of an uncontrolled budworm outbreak that started back in 1975. Large areas of the Highlands Nat'l Park have not yet returned to their pre-budworm state more than 40 years after the outbreak. It may give them cause to reconsider their present stand on no budworm control.

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