Latest Comments

  • Greg Lay on
    Softwood lumber aid package likely to go to cabinet Tuesday

    Coment:
    Canada's future as a global trading Nation is dependent on actively seeking out markets for our forest products in countries other than the US A program of subsidies for wood products manufacturers oriented to aggressively assisting them to access markets in Asia and the Middle East It appears Canada is supporting an attempt to resurrect the Transpacific Trade Pact Non of these countries are concerned that our forest industry has a subsidized log supply The future of a vibrant forest industry lies beyond the US border

  • George Delisle on
    Trump May Not Want Ontario Lumber – But Habitat for Humanity GTA Does!

    Coment:
    Building homes for humanity with local wood is a great project. Why don't we have a Federal Policy policy for dealing with major catastrophes around the world, where Canada provides lumber from Canada to build shelters instead of just giving money to the cause. Many times the money donated by the people and the Canadian government ends up as administration and some times as bribes in corrupt politicians pockets in far off lands. Would not it be better for everyone if this money was used to buy and ship Canadian lumber to areas that are desperate for shelter espescially in earth quake disasters. Wood stands up better to earth quakes, so why don't we capitalize on the the strength of the properties of wood, and help everyone at the same time? Tell the Americans to go pound sand if they don't want our wood. It is time that we start to find alternate markets for all our wood, not just some of it. As long as we are held captive to the American markets, we will remain a slave to them. The oil industry is the same situation. We need off shore markets for more Canadian products period. If the Canadian government buys large chucks of what we produce and donate it to "countries in need", it will help diversify the markets. It also exposes other parts of the world to Canadian products, and that is not a bad thing. George Delisle

  • Ross on
    Quebec mayors head to Washington to plead for softwood lumber deal

    Coment:
    This is a good move. During the last dispute the Federation of Canadian Municipalities did something similar but they met with some key mayors of the Democratic Party because Clinton was in power at that time. I would suggest something similar be done again but meet with the people who will be negatively affected by the dispute. Builders and developers, Black Political Caucus, Hispanic Caucuses in key states etc. I wouldn't waste time with the US Lumber Coalition because their mind is made up and won't change. Meet with those who don't support the US Lumber Coalition and those who are border line and need education.

  • Ross on
    Industry aims to launch legal challenge against tariff

    Coment:
    I agree with the Minister of National Revenue. This dispute recycles itself about every 10 years. Diversification of markets is critical and should be a priority. It won't help for now but the past shows that as soon as an agreement with the US occurs, the Canadian industry gets complacent. Diversification of market doesn't goes down on the priority list. One also should look at the influence of environmental ENGO's. They find this dispute to their liking because there will be less management of the forest.

  • Greg Lay on
    Logger woes could topple B.C.’s softwood lumber industry

    Coment:
    The evolution of forest management and policy since 1910 has been significantly effected by 4 Royal Commisions of Enquiry and 1 Commisions of Enquiry 1910 Fulton, 1945 Sloan, 1956 Sloan, 1976 Pearce and 1991 Peal Each of these Commisions resulted in changes to forest policy and management Not all recommendations were accepted by governments of the day but generally legislation was enacted which reflected what was required to modernize the current forest sector conditions It is time for Government to undertake another Royal Commisions charged with identifying current forest challenges like determining the relationship between natural forests and managed forests, the stumpage system, and a log market which lacks the ability to allocate the right log to the right mill

  • Ross on
    Short-line railways surviving, not thriving

    Coment:
    Good luck folks. The federal government doesn't care about northern Ontario or northern Canada in general. They pay lip service but rhetoric is cheap. I wouldn't be surprised if the environmental grievance business influences the government to not help these lines because it helps their objectives of reducing resource development.

  • George Delisle on
    Logger woes could topple B.C.’s softwood lumber industry

    Coment:
    It is time to look very carefully at our current tenure system to see if it is functioning the way it was supposed to. The concentration of tenure into fewer hands has not been good for the contractors, independent log suppliers, local communities, and also the health of our forests. The big companies have become too big to fail, something like the car companies. They pack way too much sway with the government and the mill managers are dictating forest management and compensation to the work force. This attitude is what gave us unions for the sawmills many years ago and it appears that that we may have to head that way in some fashion with the logging contractors and independent log suppliers. If we all just say no we will no longer deliver logs for that price and the mills run out of logs, you will see a change in attitude with mill managers. The same goes for the waste that is going on in the bush. Loggers have to go to the expense to get the wood to the landing and then are forced to throw anything but a perfect log into the slash pile. This results in over cutting the timber supply and we will pay the price in the long run, but not before senior management has retired with a healthy pension, unless the company goes bankrupt with an under funded pension plan. What did the big companies do with their profits in the last few years??? They took the money south of the border to buy up mills down there. Now they will stand to recover some of the softwood lumber tariff that the loggers in BC will be asked to pay for in poor rates for logging. You can bet your bottom dollar, if any of the tariff is returned to Canada in the future, none of if will be passed onto the log suppliers. The Federal government needs to come up with a policy that ensures a portion of the tariff is passed along to the log suppliers that took the hit because of the tariff. Just my thoughts on the issue. GD

  • The Unique Challenges of Conserving Large Old Trees

    Coment:
    It's not like Washington is listening to California now on any issue. There is a fair argument that Washington is not listening to anyone outside of direct contributors. Perhaps California's Governor Brown should consider himself a political contributor and demand the same respect - and fealty - as the Super PACs.

  • Brian Kurikka on
    Softwood lumber decision Tuesday is Trump’s next chance to hammer Canada

    Coment:
    Lets continue working on new markets for our lumber industry with the goal of less reliance on US markets. Could we get to the point of selling to the USA on our terms, not theirs?

  • Ross on
    Y2Y encourages new approach to forestry

    Coment:
    Fake claims by the CAVE people. (Citizens Against Virtually Everything). Those living in the headwaters or close to the headwaters should not be there if they were consistent. The roads, streets, houses, other infrastructure all permanently destroy the environment. Those people living in Cochrane and commuting to Calgary aren't sacrificing they are part of the problem by increasing GHG etc. Finally, when the forest is totally saved from resource development it will a wonderful fuel source for extreme forest fires. Then erosion and other toxics will be sent into the waterways.

  • Gerry Lee on
    Final chapter of Parry Sound’s pine-logging era opened 100 years ago

    Coment:
    Interesting article. My dad's hunt camp sits in the area described, on the Pickerel River. My family visits every summer, and has seen some of the logging historical "remains" at Lost Channel, and read the food inventories of the camps stored at the Lost Channel restaurant. My father in law worked out of the camp near Lost Channel.Fascinating times!

  • Wayne Hansen on
    Canada taking command in the charge on tall wood structures, says analyst

    Coment:
    I would think that this is an invitation to the great possibility of a catastrophic episode if there ever was a fire. I think it would be an inferno that could result in the loss of many lives and react like an outdoor campfire with stacked wood that would burn like an incendiary had been put on the building. The other issue is that of silent living spaces and privacy. Wood buildings tend to broadcast noise very well and with some people walking a lot harder and louder than others and the occupancy of children, this could be a contentious issue as well unless there was a big investment in sound proofing insulation throughout such a structure.

  • The oaks of Vimy: One man’s mission to restore a natural treasure to the battlefield

    Coment:
    Thank you Monty McDonald for your patriotism. I wish you luck to bring back the mighty oak to Vimy ridge. I plan on visiting some day.

  • Marg Carruthers on
    The oaks of Vimy: One man’s mission to restore a natural treasure to the battlefield

    Coment:
    What a great project! Repatriate some of the oak trees from their offspring.

  • George Delisle on
    Inaccuracies riddle forestry column – Comment

    Coment:
    I think it is important to understand how we got into this problem in the first place. The beetle problem did not blow up all of a sudden. There is lots of blame to go around for this disaster. It starts at the Park policy of not allowing any harvesting to prevent beetle problems from getting out of hand to start with, to the Professional Foresters that mis-read the problem, to the enviornmentalists that tried to stop every effort to control the beetle by harvesting, to the way that stumpages are calculated, to Corporate greed, to the regulations that are not in step with the life cycle of the beetles. So don't blame the problem at just one group, because they all contributed to the problem. The question that needs to be asked is "have we learned anything from our past mistakes" or are we going to allow the same problem to develop with Douglas Fir Bark Beetle and Spruce Bark Beetle. I am afraid that we have not learned any thing as the Spruce Bark Beetle appears to be out of control in the Ominica area and the Douglas Fir Bark Beetle is heading in the same direction in the rest of the province. It is time to put collective heads together and take them out of the sand. Cheers George Delisle

  • John Chittick on
    Opinion: Shipping raw logs out of B.C. is bleeding our forest industry and communities dry

    Coment:
    The temporary closure of that mill has nothing to do with log exports. Pulp logs aren't harvested on the Coast independent of stands of significantly more valuable timber as the price for such logs doesn't come close to covering the cost of harvesting, stumpage, transportation etc. Export logs fetch prices orders of magnitude higher than pulp logs thereby making more pulp logs available for mills. The authors of this opinion piece represent a strange alliance of those living off the union dues of workers in mills that have been at the margin of economic viability for decades and hysteria campaigners intent on killing those tenuous jobs along with the forest workers involved in currently more viable areas of the sector.

  • Ross on
    Tax phase-in approved for West Fraser plant

    Coment:
    This is good news for all. As mentioned Hinton council did this previously for the benefit of all. It was key was when the mill was considering expansion and modernization. Then mill manager Ken Hall said the council was key to the success of the project going forward . The company and town had positive relationship with the community via agreements and the company contributed to community organizations. It will be interesting if West Fraser in Hinton will return to being more involved in the community like former forest companies.

  • Brian Campbell on
    Remembering the Canadian Forestry Corps

    Coment:
    Thank you for this tribute to the volunteer soldiers of the Canadian Forestry Corps. My late father served through WW2, keeping equipment running, producing lumber and materials starting from Scotland's forests and then following the fighting across western Europe. Plenty of action and risk. Cheers.

  • Ross on
    Inaccuracies riddle forestry column – Comment

    Coment:
    A letter of reality. Thank you Art.

  • Al stewart on
    Inaccuracies riddle forestry column – Comment

    Coment:
    Excellent response !! We need lots more of this type of pushback. Again...excellent.

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